HAVE YOU BEEN EXPOSED TO WATER CONTAMINATION AT CAMP LEJEUNE?

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If you or a family member was impacted by the water toxicity found at US Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, we're here to help. Simply fill out our easy form to see if you qualify for a claim.

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What happened at Camp Lejeune?

During the years 1953-1987, water supplies at US Marine Corps base Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina were contaminated with multiple hazardous chemicals linked to a range of serious health conditions and illnesses, including cancer, birth defects, Parkinson’s disease, and other potentially life-threatening injuries.

More than one million people lived and worked at Camp Lejeune during the time that the water was contaminated. This includes active duty and former military service members, families, non-military staff, and others. These individuals drank, bathed in, cooked with, and otherwise came into frequent contact with the contaminated water.

If you, a family member, or a loved one has suffered health effects as a result of the water contamination at Camp Lejeune or MCAS New River, you may be eligible to participate in the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit. Filing a claim is easy thanks to the Honoring Our PACT Act (H.R. 3967) and the Camp Lejeune Justice Act of 2022. These laws are expected to achieve final passage through Congress and be signed into law soon.

Benefit coverage is available to those who lived in the following areas: Camp Lejeune Greater Sandy Run, Stone Bay Rifle Range, Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) New River, Camp Geiger, Camp Johnson/Montford Point, Tarawa Terrace, Holcomb Boulevard, Hadnot Point, Camp Lejeune Military Reservation, and Onslow Beach.

What illnesses were caused by the toxic water contamination at Camp Lejeune?

In 2012, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs released a list of presumptive conditions related to the toxic water contamination at Camp Lejeune. These illnesses include:

Adult leukemia

Aplastic anemia and other myelodysplastic syndromes

Bladder cancer

Breast cancer

Esophageal cancer

Female infertility

Hepatic steatosis

Kidney cancer

Leukemia

Liver cancer

Lung cancer

Miscarriage

Multiple myeloma

Myelodysplastic syndromes

Neurobehavioral effects

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Parkinson’s disease

Renal toxicity

Scleroderma

Potentially other significant illnesses

WHAT WAS THE WATER CONTAMINATED WITH?

The contaminated water was primarily found in two treatment plants, the Tarawa Terrace Treatment Plant and the Hadnot Point Treatment Plant. The main toxic chemicals discovered in these plants were Tetrachloroethylene (also known as perchloroethylene or “PCE”) and Trichloroethylene (TCE). TCE and PCE are chemicals that are used in dry cleaning and in cleaning metal parts of machines. There were multiple sources of contamination of these water plants, including leaking underground storage tanks and waste disposal sites.

HOW DO I KNOW IF I QUALIFY FOR A CAMP LEJEUNE LAWSUIT?

If you lived at Camp Lejeune or MCAS New River for at least thirty cumulative days from August 1953 through December 1987 and are suffering from one of these illnesses, you may qualify. If your family member lived there and passed away from one of these illnesses or other illnesses, you may qualify. Contact one of our attorneys today to discuss whether you should bring a lawsuit for Camp Lejeune toxic water contamination.

Find Out If You Qualify

This all happened a long time ago. Why now?

In June 2021, legislators in the United States Congress introduced a bill that would allow individuals who lived or worked at Camp Lejeune and suffer from one or more of these illnesses to file a lawsuit against the United States Government for their injuries.
This bill—the Honoring Our PACT Act (H.R. 3967) —gives injured people two years from the date that President Biden signs the bill into law to bring a claim for injuries related to the toxic water contamination at Camp Lejeune.

The bill received final passage from the United States Senate on August 2, 2022. The bill now heads to President Biden’s desk for signature.

We are currently representing former military service members and their spouses and children who were injured by the toxic water contamination at Camp Lejeune. Once the bill is signed into law, we will begin the process of bringing claims for our clients.

In June 2021, legislators in the United States Congress introduced a bill that would allow individuals who lived or worked at Camp Lejeune and suffer from one or more of these illnesses to file a lawsuit against the United States Government for their injuries.
This bill—the Honoring Our PACT Act (H.R. 3967) —gives injured people two years from the date that President Biden signs the bill into law to bring a claim for injuries related to the toxic water contamination at Camp Lejeune. The bill received final passage from the United States Senate on August 2, 2022. The bill now heads to President Biden’s desk for signature.

We are currently representing former military service members and their spouses and children who were injured by the toxic water contamination at Camp Lejeune. Once the bill is signed into law, we will begin the process of bringing claims for our clients.

At Riley & Jackson, P.C., we are known for our preparation, hard work, creativity, and trial experience.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why do I need a Lawyer?

Our attorneys believe that all claimants will need to at least file a claim with the federal government if they want to participate in any future settlement related to the Camp Lejeune toxic water contamination. More likely, all claimants will need to file a lawsuit in Federal Court in North Carolina. Our attorneys will help you navigate the legal process from the filing of a claim or lawsuit to resolution through settlement or trial.

Can I bring a claim if I was at Camp Lejeune but not in the military?

Yes. The Camp Lejeune Justice Act allows for any person who lived or worked at Camp Lejeune or MCAS New River for at least 30 days between August 1953 and December 1957 to bring a claim, even if that person was not a member of the Marines or another branch of the military.

Can I bring a claim on behalf of a parent or other loved one who lived at Camp Lejeune but has since passed away?

Yes. The Camp Lejeune Justice Act allows for the legal representative of any person who could otherwise bring a claim to bring a claim on behalf of that person